Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Mayor Levar M. Stoney Statement on Monument Avenue


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When I spoke about the monuments earlier this summer, it was from an optimism that we can take the power away from these statues by telling their true story, for the first time.

As I said in June, it is my belief that, as they currently stand without explanation, the confederate statues on Monument Avenue are a default endorsement of a shameful period in our national and city history that do not reflect the values of inclusiveness, equality and diversity we celebrate in today’s Richmond. 

I wish they had never been built. 

Still, I believed that as a first step, there was a need to set the historical record straight. That is why I asked the Monument Avenue Commission to solicit public input and to suggest a complete and truthful narrative of these statues, who built them and why they were erected. 

When it comes to these complicated questions that involve history, slavery, Jim Crow and war, we all must have the humility to admit that our answers are inherently inadequate. These are challenges so fundamental to the history of our country, commonwealth, and city that reducing them to the question of whether or not a monument should remain is, by definition, an oversimplification. 

But context is important in both historical, and present day, perspectives. While we had hoped to use this process to educate Virginians about the history behind these monuments, the events of the last week may have fundamentally changed our ability to do so by revealing their power to serve as a rallying point for division and intolerance and violence. 

These monuments should be part of our dark past and not of our bright future. I personally believe they are offensive and need to be removed. But I believe more in the importance of dialogue and transparency by pursuing a responsible process to consider the full weight of this decision. 

Effective immediately, the Monument Avenue Commission will include an examination of the removal and/or relocation of some or all of the confederate statues.

Continuing this process will provide an opportunity for the public to be heard and the full weight of this decision to be considered in a proper forum where we can have a constructive and civil dialogue.

Let me be clear: we will not tolerate allowing these statues and their history to be used as a pretext for hate and violence, or to allow our city to be threatened by white supremacists and neo-Nazi thugs. We will protect our city and keep our residents safe.

As I said a few weeks ago, our conversation about these Monuments is important. But what is more important to our future is focusing on building higher-quality schools, alternatives to our current public housing that provide dignity and safety for all, and policies to provide opportunities for all Richmonders to succeed.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Public Schedule of the Mayor: August 16 - 18



Wednesday, August 16

11 a.m.        Mayor to attend special announcement at Kings Dominion
                   16000 Theme Park Way
                    Doswell, VA

11:30 a.m.   Brown Bag Lunch with Department of Public Utilities
                    400 Jefferson Davis Highway
                    Closed Press

2:30 p.m.     Mayor to deliver remarks at Mayor’s Youth Academy closing event
                    101 E. Franklin St.

Thursday, August 17

10 a.m.       Mayor to participate in Hillside Community Walk
                   1500 Hardwood St.

Friday, August 18

10 a.m.       Mayor to deliver remarks at Virginia Commonwealth University’s School of  Education Opening Convocation
                   Eugene P. and Lois Trani Center for Life Sciences Building
                  1000 W. Cary St.

11 a.m.       Mayor to attend the funeral of Virginia State Trooper Berke Bates
                  Saint Paul’s Baptist Church
                  4247 Creighton Rd.